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Gone But Not Forgotten: Poland and the Recovery of Its Jewish Past

Gone But Not Forgotten: Poland and the Recovery of Its Jewish Past will tell the story of a number of non-Jewish Polish individuals who responded to the Polish communist regime's open embrace of anti-Semitism in 1968 by becoming "anti-anti-Semites."  They have challenged the ethno-nationalist prejudice that for nearly a century dominated much of polish political and social life. 

According to director Menachem Daum, the conventional wisdom that Polish anti-Semitism is endemic and innate is being overturned by the Poles themselves.  Since the fall of the Soviet Union, Poles have been deeply involved in a profound internal transformation both in their relationship to Jews and to their history that is little known to the outside world.  These "dissidents, ranging from staid academics to punk rockers, cemetery restorers to museum directors, theater directors to clergy," Daum says, " have had little patience for the official line that once urged Poles to view Jews as 'the enemy within.'" 

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All donations for the production and distribution of Gone But Not Forgotten are tax-deductible to the fullest extent of the law.

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Hartley Update 

Menachem is interviewing "anti-anti-Semites" in Poland to determine which characters to develop the film narrative around in the coming months.

If you would like to explore films with similar themes, please click on Judaism.